Style-1900

Welcome to Style 1900, an antique shop specialising in 20th century decorative arts.

Our shop is based on the seafront at St Leonards on Sea. Originally know as ‘Hastings New Town’ the surrounding area is littered with stunning architecture, the product of the brilliant 19th century architect, Decimus Burton, a leading exponent of the Greek Revival, Georgian and Regency styles. Later in life he went in to design landmark buildings including Wellington Arch and The Atheneum Club, all in central London.

Here, on Grand Parade we aim to provide a good selection of furniture, lighting, ceramics, glass, pictures & paintings, mirrors, tiles, carpets, books, fenders, fire screens and tools  alongside decorative copper & brass metal work.

Our main focus is on Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Arts & Crafts and the Aesthetic Movement as well as a few pieces in the European Secessionist style.

Art Deco.

Often simply referred to as ‘Deco’, a creative movement that emerged in France just before WW1. Very much a style of visual arts which influenced the design of buildings, furniture, jewellery, ceramics, glass and everyday objects such as radios and vacuum cleaners.

In the late 1920’s the decorative style changed and, inspired by new materials and technologies became much sleeker and less ornamental.

Art Nouveau

Emerged prior to the birth of the 20th century. Prevalent between 1880 and 1910 it was the first Style to stop looking back on history for inspiration. Instead it took its ideas from what it saw around it, in particular the natural world, with sinuous plant like lines.

Arts & Crafts

A truly international movement that flourished between 1880 and 1920. Beginning in the UK and spreading across Europe, North America and Japan.

The term was first used by T.J. Cobden-Sanderson at a meeting of the Arts & Crafts Society in 1887’ inspired by Augustus Pugin, John Ruskin and William Morris.

The Aesthetic Movement

The Aesthetic Movement was a late 19th century movement that championed pure beauty alongside ‘art for arts sake’. It emphasised both the visual and the sensual qualities of art and design over practical, moral or narrative considerations.

The movement flourished in the UK during the 1870’s and 1880’s and was equally important in both fine and applied arts.

In the latter it can be seen as part of the revolution in design initiated by William Morris, with the launch of Morris & Co in 1882. From1875 the ideals of aestheticism were commercialised by Thor Liberty store in the west end of London.

Liberty were also soon to popularise the Art Nouveau Style.

Critic, Walter Hamilton was the first writer to identify the movement with the publication of ‘The Aesthetic Movement in England’ in 1882.